A few more additions to the SHE holiday office party

Earlier this year, we set up shop for our large-scale production in the Ngoma district. In the past few months, we have built out our factory, added electricity and water, installed our machinery, and have successfully produced fluff! These are huge wins!

Now, we are on our way to making pads, and we have built a great team at our Ngoma production site. Without further ado, meet our latest SHE Trailblazers that are part of Team SHE!

Scroll below to learn more about Nadine, Gaudence, Sandrine, Marie Louise Umulisa, Ernestine, Marie Louise Murereyimana, Christine, and Sam!



Nadine (first photo): My name is Nadine and I am passionate about learning new things. Before joining SHE, I was working as an accountant at Anglican church. What I like about SHE's work is that I making products with my hands. I want to pursue my studies in technology because with technology things always change. I also like fashion. In my free time, I like to sing, follow fashion trends and watch movies.

Gaudence (at left in second photo): My name is Gaudence but everyone calls me Mimi. I studied literature and linguistics at secondary school. Prior to joining SHE, I was working as a matron in at a boarding school in Matimba. I am glad that I am learning how to make pads, since it's a very useful product that I can't live without each month. I like that SHE is making pads at an affordable price. In my free time, I like to pray, help my parents with house work, and to sing in a choir. My dream is to have a happy family and be able to provide all things that my children need.

Sandrine (at right in second photo): My name is Sandrine. I am married with 3 children - I have 1 boy and 2 girls. At school, I studied electricity. I am very excited to be a SHE employee because I want to pursue my career in the technical field.

When I heard about SHE and its work, I thought it would be a nice place for me to work for as a woman. Usually no one talks about menstruation in public and I like that SHE is trying to change things. My dream is to continue my studies in a technical field. This is my first time working in a factory and I am proud of that because I was once told that women could never work in a factory. I'm glad that SHE has now made that possible.

Marie Louise U (third photo with banana fiber): I am married and have two children, a daughter and a son. Prior to joining SHE, I had a small shop selling food. I am a local leader in charge of development in my village. Since joining SHE, my life has changed. I have made new friends among my colleagues and decided to return to school to learn English.

When I tell my friends that I work at the factory that makes pads, they are impressed and this makes me feel proud. My dream is to pursue my studies in community development and launch an organization that assists people like SHE.

Ernestine (fourth photo): Before working with SHE, I was working with Tigo as a money transfer agent. I like being a part of SHE because it deals with menstruation and help people to have access to pads. I also enjoy that I am learning new things on the job.

In my free time, I like hanging out with friends, and singing in a choir. My dream is to pursue my studies in sociology and become an entrepreneur.

Christine (fifth photo): I studied Information and Technology at secondary school and worked as a salesperson for a fertilizer company. SHE has given me the opportunity to learn new things and also help my community.

Many people still lack access to the right information about menstruation so it's important that SHE continue to take the lead and inform people. 
In the future, I would like to build a nice house for my parents and pursue my studies. 

Marie Louise M. (sixth photo wearing a mask): I am married and have one son. What I liked about SHE is that it employs women to work in a factory. It is unusual for women to be working in a factory since many bosses fear that when a woman become pregnant, she will not work as hard as a man.


I also serve as a community health worker in my village. I have realized that menstruation itself is not a problem; the problem is that girls and women do not know how to manage it. 

Ever since I was young, I dreamt of becoming a doctor. Although I am not one, I am happy to be working in the health sector. Today I dream of working hard to be able to support my family and to have a happy life.

Samuel (last photo): At secondary school, I studied car mechanics. Before joining SHE, I worked in a hair salon that I also own. I like my job at SHE because it fits with my career goals. I am learning new things and also enjoy my colleagues.

1 comment:

Yvonne Langer said...

I am currently writing my master's thesis on this topic and stumbled across the 'menstrual man', Arunachalam Muruganantham, who invented a machine to produce sanitary napkins that can be handled easily and does not need any maintenance as it is simply constructed. I am sure that you had a look at it already as I read that he had a co-op with MIT as well but I was wondering if you could not use his technology to proceed. In India, they use wood fiber instead of banana fiber but the rest of the process might suit your project as well.
Keep up the good work!